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About Editor

Janice Campbell is the Director of NAIWE, and the current editor of the NewsWire. Her personal blog is at http://Janice.NAIWE.com

“Authors Helping Healthcare” Interview Series Begins

Writers’ Interview Series

February marks the launch of the Authors Helping Healthcare interview series. Part conversation, part writers’ workshop, Authors Helping Healthcare is designed for communicators working in healthcare, although will be of interest to anyone in healthcare who appreciates quality writing, fiction and new insights.

Through Authors Helping Healthcare, respected authors talk about their books and work, plus offer a dose of advice and inspiration to communicators and writers working in hospitals and healthcare.

About the Authors

Carol Cassella, M.D.

Kicking off the series is novelist Carol Cassella, M.D. Dr. Cassella is a practicing physician and the national bestselling author of three novels, Gemini (2014), Healer (2010) and Oxygen (2008), each published by Simon & Schuster and translated into multiple foreign languages. All of her novels draw from her personal experience as a physician, her role as a mother, and her interest in medical ethics and the complexities of contemporary healthcare. Read the interview.

Lisa See

Lisa See is the New York Times bestselling author of The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane, Snow Flower and the Secret Fan, Peony in Love, Shanghai Girls, China Dolls, and Dreams of Joy, which debuted at #1. She is also the author of On Gold Mountain, which tells the story of her Chinese American family’s settlement in Los Angeles. She was honored as National Woman of the Year by the Organization of Chinese American Women in 2001 and was the recipient of the Chinese American Museum’s History Makers Award in fall 2003. Read the interview.

Coming Soon

Mary Beth Keane is author of The Walking People and Fever. In 2015, Ms. Keane was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for Fiction.

“Although the type of journalistic writing practiced in healthcare and fiction writing are quite different — one presents facts and the other an artistic interpretation of facts — there is so much knowledge writers can gain from these successful authors,” says Maren Dale, a healthcare consultant and copywriter who manages the program. “In the interviews, authors talk about their path to success and offer inspiration.

They discuss the topics they tackle in their books and offer fresh insights. Plus, authors reveal advice and useful tips that writers in healthcare can use to improve their skills.”

For More Information

To access the latest Authors Helping Healthcare interviews:

Go to LinkedIn. Select “Posts” from the drop-down menu in the Search window. Next, type in “Authors Helping Healthcare” for the latest interviews, or

Visit Maren Dale’s profile page on LinkedIn to see posts. Interviews are conducted by Maren Dale of M.J. Dale Communications, LLC. Contact Maren Dale at maren@maren-dale.com for more information about Authors Helping Healthcare.

Carol Topp Wins TAP! 2013 Scholarship from NAIWE

Carol Topp, CPA: Taxes and the Freelance Writer or Editor

Carol Topp, CPA

We’re delighted to recognize Carol Topp, CPA, the NAIWE Accounting for Freelancers Expert, as the winner of the TAP! 2013 Scholarship. She’ll be joining us at the Technologically Advanced Publishing Conference in Orlando, Florida, just three weeks from now, and will be a guest at dinner with NAIWE Director, Janice Campbell.

There are still a few spots left at this conference, and we’d love to see you there (NAIWE members are invited to join us for dinner). You can register at www.TAP2013.com. If you are in publishing or work with those who are, you’ll leave this conference with information that can help you make 2013 your best year ever. We hope you can come!

How to Get the Most Out of Your Blog Posts: An Infographic

Blogging can help build your career by bringing readers to your website and letting them know what you do. Whether you are a freelance writer, copyeditor, or author (published or unpublished), a blog can help potential clients or readers sample your writing style, subject matter, and expertise. It’s one of the simplest and most effective ways to market your work.

Here is an infographic that describes 12 simple, free things you can do after you write a blog post. For more ideas on why and how to do this, visit the member area and listen to the April teleclass with PR Expert, Diana Ennen.

Your Blog Post Promotion Checklist from DivvyHQ.com

How to get the most promotional mileage out of your posts on your NAIWE member blog.

Tax Expert Carol Topp, CPA, to talk about Taxes for Freelancers

Carol Topp, CPA: Taxes and the Freelance Writer or EditorNAIWE members are invited to join us on Wednesday, 22 February, for a special call with our Accounting for Freelancers Expert, Carol Topp, CPA. Bring your accounting and tax questions, and Carol will answer as many as possible during our hour together. In Tax Tips for Writers in 2012 she’ll cover:

  • Anything new in taxes?
  • Mileage records
  • Business use of the home deduction
  • The IRS doesn’t email (scam alert)
  • Tax software can lie to you
  • When do you need a CPA ?

This members-only program will air on February 22, 2012 at 3:30 EST.

Carol Topp,CPA, is an accountant and the author of Business Tips and Taxes for Writers. Through her writing, speaking and consulting, Carol converts confusing tax rules and business language into clear, easy-to-understand English for readers. Visit TaxesForWriters.com for tax tips and business articles for the writer, blogger, freelancer and author.

Business Tips and Taxes for Writers by Carol Topp, CPABonus: We’ll give away one copy of Carol’s new book, Business Tips and Taxes for Writers, to one lucky teleclass attendee. If you’re a member and would like to enter but can’t be at the teleclass, just e-mail a question for Carol to Janice@NAIWE.com, and you’ll be included in the opportunity to win the book. If you don’t win, the book is available from the NAIWE Bookstore.
3:30 pm EST on Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Members will find call-in information in the member area. Just log in at the top of any NAIWE page; click on the “Library” link, and then the “Members-Only Blog” link. We’ll send a reminder via e-mail as well. Be sure that you’ve whitelisted *@naiwe.com (an asterisk, followed by @naiwe.com) in your e-mail program so that you receive the message.

If you’re not a member and you’d like to join in time for the teleclass, you may click on this “Join NAIWE” link to do so. If you would like to register for the teleclass only, you may do so by visiting the Teleclass page.

Ghostwriting Teleclass for NAIWE Members

Why learn ghostwriting if you don’t want to be a ghostwriter?

  • Ghostwriters can complete a novel in 12-14 months, concept to final draft.
  • Ghostwriters can complete a nonfiction manuscript, fully edited, in 6-8 months.

They’re not necessarily better writers, they simply have a perspective and skill set different from the ones taught to writers and aspiring authors. NAIWE’s Ghostwriting Expert Claudia Suzanne will talk about the differences between writers and and ghostwriters, including what you need to see your manuscripts the way agents and publishers do.

Join us on Wednesday, 18 January, 2012 at 3:30 p.m. EST to learn more about ghosting and why it might be a good addition to your skills toolbox.

NOTE: The recording of this teleclass can now be found in the member area.


Members will find call-in information in the member area. Just log in at the top of any NAIWE page; click on the “Library” link, and then the “Members-Only Blog” link. We’ll send a reminder via e-mail as well. Be sure that you’ve whitelisted *@naiwe.com (an asterisk, followed by @naiwe.com) in your e-mail program so that you receive the message.

If you’re not a member and you’d like to join in time for the teleclass, you may click on this “Join NAIWE” link to do so. If you would like to register for the teleclass only, you may do so by visiting the Teleclass page.

Member Teleclass: How to Complete Your Projects . . . Especially the Ones That Have Been Bugging You

Want to know how to knock out those projects that just hang on and on? Join us for this month’s member teleclass, “How to Complete Your Projects . . . Especially the Ones That Have Been Bugging You,” with NAIWE expert Meggin Meggin McIntosh, NAIWE's Productivity ExpertMcIntosh, The Ph.D of Productivity. She’ll delve into her experience to share sharp strategies for finishing even the most challenging projects.

Thursday, 12 January 2012

3:30 p.m. EST

Click this link for Meggin’s very helpful handouts.

We’ll talk about:

  • The #1 reason too many of your projects remain uncompleted.
  • The belief that is preventing you from ever getting some of your projects into the pipeline–so of course they never get completed.
  • The 3 tools you must have to get your projects completed.
  • The best secret for giving yourself peace of mind–even if it gives you a jolt of overwhelm first!
 How to get started so you have meaningful projects completed in a reasonable timeframe.
  • The 5 questions to ask and answer to know whether you are actually going to make any progress on your projects – or if you are woefully resigned to continue to live a life of frustration, unfulfilled possibilities, and lost opportunities.

Members will find call-in information in the member area. Just log in at the top of any NAIWE page; click on the “Library” link, and then the “Members-Only Blog” link. We’ll send a reminder via e-mail as well. Be sure that you’ve whitelisted *@naiwe.com (an asterisk, followed by @naiwe.com) in your e-mail program so that you receive the message.

If you’re not a member and you’d like to join in time for the teleclass, you may click on this “Join NAIWE” link to do so. If you would like to register for the teleclass only, you may do so by visiting the Teleclass page.

Meggin’s workshop can help you enter the new year with confidence and a clean slate. We hope you’ll join us!

Tinie Tao, October Member of the Month

Tinie Tao, a freelance writer and editor, is NAIWE’s October Member of the Month. Tinie effectively uses her NAIWE website (TinieTao.NAIWE.com) as a showcase for her fresh, accessible writing style. I think you’ll enjoy her interview. Join us for the audio interview at 2 p.m. EDT on Thursday, the 13th of October at The Freelance Life.

Q: Please share a little of your professional history with our readers.

I’m currently writing and editing for The Infusion Project, an organization that promotes and throws live art events downtown for artists to get their work out there. I also write blogs for New Evolution Video, a San Diego video marketing company.

Q: How and when did you make this business a reality?

I quit my admin/office job, which was my first position out of college, after about ten months there.  I knew from that experience that I wanted to jump into my passion and start enjoying every day of my life now.  I was already writing for New Evolution at the time, and I was able to ramp up the quality and amount of writing I did for them when I liberated myself from the day job hamster wheel.

Q: What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned thus far in your career?

I actually create my highest quality writing when I focus on others.  I stay on track when I ask myself, “How can I help this client?  How can I best serve the readers?” My priority moves from being about  how much money I’m getting out of the deal to creating the most fun-to-read content I can for an audience.

Q: What are some of the teachers, books, or authors who have influenced your professional life in a positive way?

I love Carol Tice’s Make A Living Writing blogs and Steve Pavlina’s personal development blogs.  Steve teaches that we ramp up personal wealth by creating and delivering value.  We already know that we’re talented!

We create financial abundance by getting others to see our talents.  We profit when others recognize and purchase the enormous benefits to themselves from our products and services.

Q: As a seasoned professional, what advice would you offer an independent writer or editor who is just beginning a career?

Take risks, and try new things!

Q: What inspires you?

Sharing positive energy with entrepreneurs building amazing businesses.  I love that my clients’ industries (ie. art, entertainment, technology) are young, hip, and full of life.

Q: How has your membership in NAIWE benefited you professionally?

My NAIWE membership equipped me with the tools I need (ie. WordPress platform, examples by other members) to create and publish my online writing portfolio.

May Member of the Month: Whitney Hopler

Whitney Hopler, Freelance Writer and Editor, NAIWE Member of the Month- May 2011Whitney Hopler, a freelance editor and inspirational writer, is the NAIWE Member of the Month for May. Whitney very effectively uses her NAIWE website (WhitneyHopler.NAIWE.com) by including the URL in her article bios and other materials, and she continues to develop her freelance career in a direction that’s both personally and professionally rewarding. I think you’ll enjoy her interview.

Q: Please share a little of your professional history with our readers.

A: I began my journalism career in college at George Mason University, where I served on the campus newspaper’s staff as an editor and worked for a chain of local newspapers as a reporter through an internship. After graduation, I went straight to work for the local newspapers as a reporter covering a wide variety of stories. However, several years into reporting, I began to feel depressed about my job. I had a nagging sense that I’d be better suited to writing stories that people reflected on more than newspaper reports, but didn’t know how to go about doing so.

One day I sat in someone’s living room interviewing her for a profile and noticed her pet parrot nearby.  At the bottom of the parrot’s cage was a copy of that day’s newspaper, with my latest cover story featured in all its glory – and the bird had pooped all over it. That, for me, graphically illustrated the fact that my stories might have been interesting but didn’t offer much lasting value. It turns out that God had been using my restlessness to motivate me to seek His will for my life more, and when I did, I sensed that He was calling me to write about what I thought mattered most: faith. So I quit my job and devoted time to prayer while working on a freelance project.

At the right time, God provided a job that was a much better fit for me, and a much better job overall – as an editor for The Salvation Army’s national magazines. Ever since then, every job I’ve gotten has come to me through prayer and having the confidence to take risks to follow where I sensed God leading me.  After my first child – my daughter Honor – was born, I needed a job with a more flexible schedule, and over the years God has provided jobs that included serving as the religion editor for a newspaper chain and editing a channel for Crosswalk.com, the largest Christian site on the Internet. I’ve been serving as an inspirational writer and editor now for about 17 years.

Q: How and when did you make this business a reality?

A: When a different corporation took over Crosswalk.com, I was faced with a dilemma: either move to a different area to keep my staff position, or work with Crosswalk.com on a freelance basis. I didn’t want to uproot my family, so I began freelancing for Crosswalk.com, and gradually added other freelance clients as I could. Now it’s been about 9 years since I began freelancing full time, and I’m grateful that I can continue to write regularly for Crosswalk.com and other clients.

Q: What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned thus far in your career?

A: When searching for jobs or freelance projects, don’t settle for less than the best, because God will provide the best if you’re willing to trust Him. No matter what your professional field is, you have a choice. You can either jump into any job or project that comes your way simply to make money and have something to do, or you can ask God to lead you to what’s best for you and work hard to earn it, taking whatever risks you need to take to grow.

The times when I haven’t trusted God to lead me, I’ve gotten by, but I didn’t enjoy my work very much or see many positive results from it. When I have trusted God, though, my work has given me a lot of joy and led to something great happening – people’s lives actually changed for the better. So I’ve learned that people facing career decisions should seek God’s will (rather than just how much money they can make, what logistics are involved with job, etc., which are secondary to the primary concern of how they can best contribute to the world through their work) and be confident that God will lead them to what’s best.

Q: Are you working on any special projects you’d like to tell us about?

A: About.com has just hired me to serve as the guide for its new site about angels and miracles. I’m excited about engaging readers of all perspectives (believers from every religion and skeptics alike) online to discuss God’s angels and the miracles that He sometimes performs. I’m grateful that I get to be a part of delivering good news to readers, since the media so often features more bad news then the good news still that happens regularly, even in our fallen world. About.com’s angels and miracles site debuted in May. Please visit the site, tell your friends, and send me stories of your encounters with angels or miraculous events you’ve experienced. I’m looking forward to posting reader stories regularly. Also, I plan to blog about angels and miracles myself both on About.com and on my NAIWE site, so please plan to check out the blogs and let me know what you think.

Q: What are some of the teachers, books, or authors who have influenced your professional life in a positive way?

A: My high school journalism teacher, Mrs. Margo Tyree, urged me to overcome my shyness and take on an extrovert’s job – reporting for the school’s newspaper – as an introvert to gain confidence, and I did. I’ll always be grateful that she believed in my potential back when I was an insecure teen who just loved to write. Mrs. Tyree and many of my other teachers and professors also helped me become a stronger writer over the years. As for books and authors, the classic book The Elements of Style by William Strunk, Jr. and E.B. White helped me vividly see the value of writing clearly and concisely, and I think every professional writer or editor should read it.

Q: As a seasoned professional, what advice would you offer an independent writer or editor who is just beginning a career?

A: Take the time to figure out what genre of writing and editing you should focus on, since you’re more likely to get hired and do a great job if you’re working on projects that are best for you. What are you most interested in? What distinctive talents and skills can you offer? For instance, some writers and editors are best suited for technical projects and others for creative projects. Some have experience covering a particular field, such as sports or business. If you’re not sure what to focus on, pray for guidance, and you’ll figure it out.

Q: What inspires you?

A: It’s inspiring for me to read a compelling story of how God has worked in someone’s life to change that person for the better in some way. I can’t get enough of stories like that!  All of our individual stories are incredibly significant because they’re connected to the ultimate story of what God is doing in our world.

Q: How has your membership in NAIWE benefited you professionally?

A: The website has proven to be a tremendously valuable tool to use when communicating with potential employers. To compete for freelance jobs today, every independent writer and editor really needs a professional website like the ones that NAIWE offers.  Also, knowing that I have NAIWE’s many resources to turn to for advice and support as needed encourages me a lot. It’s easy for freelancers to feel isolated, but NAIWE members are connected to a great community that can help all of us, so we never need to feel that we’re alone in our work.

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share?

A: I just want to thank NAIWE for giving me an opportunity to share my professional story. Hope it inspires some other NAIWE members to have confidence that their work matters to God, and He’ll lead them to some great projects when they trust their careers to Him.

Ruth Thaler-Carter: April 2011 Member of the Month

Ruth Thaler-Carter, NAIWE Member of the Month-April 2011Here’s an interview with long-time NAIWE member Ruth Thaler-Carter. She’s been freelancing for many years, and has created an interesting, profitable career with multiple streams of income. We’re delighted to have her as our Member of the Month for April 2011. You can read the review, or click on the audio recording to listen to it.

Q: Please share a little of your professional history with our readers.

Oh, gosh, where to start? I write articles for association and independent magazines and for several newsletters; write, edit and produce newsletters for associations, nonprofits and businesses; edit manuscripts for magazines, a series of regulatory courses, a World Bank division and more; proofread marketing materials for a law firm; and teach classes for a local writers’ center.
Q: How and when did you make this business a reality?
Technically, by selling my first articles to a local weekly newspaper while still in high school, but formally, by recasting a full-time association communications job into a consulting arrangement, adding two part-time onsite editing assignments, and just plunging in, back in 1984.
Q: What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned thus far in your career?
Never give up, and always do your best work.
Q: Are you working on any special projects you’d like to tell us about?
Writing four-part series of articles on eldercare for a regional lifestyle magazine, a book on the same topic with a good friend, and articles for Copyediting newsletter and the magazine of an association for owners of animal hospitals, and writing parts of and editing a book celebrating the 35th anniversary of my writers’ group. My goal for this year was to do more writing, and it’s already coming into being.
Q: What are some of the teachers, books, or authors who have influenced your professional life in a positive way?
My sixth-grade English teacher, Miss (Louise) Thomas, who taught us how to diagram sentences and instilled grammar and usage into my very being, and Miss (Elizabeth) Hart, my 11th-grade “Critical Reading and Writing” and 12th-grad AP English teacher, who gave me the organizational skills to write fast and accurately, and strengthened my belief in my writing ability.
I can’t think of any particular books, but the works of Josephine Tey, Dorothy Dunnett and Susan Roberts Shreve are long-time inspirations.
My parents, by the way, who taught me to love reading, learning and books in general; backed me up on every major decision; and demonstrated their pride in my independence.
Q: As a seasoned professional, what advice would you offer an independent writer or editor who is just beginning a career?
Never whine. Learn from colleagues. Give back as much as you get. Join and be visible in at least one professional organization. Don’t sell yourself cheap. Don’t give up!
Q: What inspires you?
The thrill of seeing my name in print and of feeling like I’ve contributed something to colleagues.
Q: How has your membership in NAIWE benefited you professionally?
Not sure yet, although this kind of opportunity should enhance my visibility, I hope!
Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share?
I really appreciate your creating the NAIWE. The more opportunities for us to interact with each other, the better professionals and more successful we all should be.

Earn More in 2010- Two Ways Freelance Writers Can Increase Income

Don't put all your eggs in one basket!

Don't put all your eggs in one basket!

A no-whiners-allowed guest article by freelance writer, Carol Tice.

As we wind down the year, I find myself looking forward to next year and the strengthening economy. But first, I wanted to look back at why 2009 was my best-earning year ever. This analysis pointed the way to a couple of key strategies for earning more in ’10 that any writer can use.

To sum up:

1) I diversified. Like mad.

2) I was open to offers to write in new formats I hadn’t yet tried yet.

In 2010, I plan to stick with this strategy, diversifying and staying open to new writing concepts as they emerge in the fast-changing world of freelance writing.

Many writers complain on my online forums about how awful particular markets are right now. I’d say they’re particularly awful for people who have all their eggs in one of them. One writer on one of my forums recently sniffed, “I write non-fiction only for magazines, and I’ve seen that market dry up this year.”

Well, boo-hoo, but are you going to just sit around and watch your sole income stream evaporate? Or are you going to market your business and secure your income by diversifying what you write, and for whom?

When I look over my client list for 2009, it has a lot of new names and projects in entirely new formats for me, including online-only exclusive pieces for print magazines, online-only magazines, “learning centers” for corporations, articles for major search portals, even articles for the Facebook fan page of an international conglomerate. I leapt from just writing my own blog to blogging for a national magazine, to blogging for corporations.

Recently, I’ve heard from writers who say their 2010 goal is to write only for print publications, or do only copywriting, or only blogging. I say that limiting your vision isn’t a good strategy right now. Successful writers in 2010 will remain open to all the possibilities.

Don’t be scared to take a flier on a new writing format. When I got back into freelancing in 2005, I got a call from a startup CEO whose company I’d previously reported on. He wanted to know if I would ghost-blog for him and write a few advertorial articles for his company Web site. Well, I had never done either of those things, and back then I hardly knew what a blog was, but I said, “Sure!” That tiny start in corporate copywriting has led to well more than $100,000 in copywriting earnings since. If I’d said no there, I likely would have earned a lot less over the past five years. Being open and diversifying works wonders for your bottom line.

Personally, I am a platform-agnostic when it comes to publishing. If a market pays well and I think I’d enjoy the writing and can deliver top-quality work on the topics, I’m game. If I had committed to only writing for print publications — which is where I started in my career — I would have passed on the majority of my 2009 income. So far, I’ve already booked some interesting new clients for January, including my first project that includes doing social media for a business.

What new markets do you plan to explore in 2010? What new clients will you find? I think writers with a diverse client list and an openness to new formats are going to see massive success next year. Hope that describes you.

Carol Tice is an award-winning freelancer for Entrepreneur magazine, Seattle Magazine, Seattle Business Monthly, Yahoo! Hotjobs, and the Seattle Times, among others. You can read more at www.CarolTice.com.